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A Guide to Using Oils in your Kitchen

Goodman Fielder Food Service
A Guide to Using Oils in your Kitchen

A Guide to Using Oils in your Kitchen

Posted on 30th November 2017
With all the different types of oil at your disposal, it can be tough to know what one to use. Here, we show you the ideal smoke point, use and benefits of each oil on the market.

Summary

It is a core kitchen ingredient that is used on a daily basis, all of the different oil variations have left some confusion as to what the difference between them is and what they are correctly used for? From canola oil, vegetable oil, cottonseed oil and sunflower oil, each
is independently made and have their own purposes of use in the foodservice industry. Though, it’s important to know that vegetable oil can be sold as a single source of Canola or Soya Bean oil or as a blend of the two types. From deep-frying to dressing salads, we explore the oil for you.

Download our Guide for using Cooking Oils (PDF 548KB)

Photo of a bowl of Canola Oil

Canola Oil

What it is made of: Canola oil is derived from the canola plant, which contains 60 to 100 pods of 30 tiny seeds that the oil is crushed from.
Feature: Source of Omega 3, high in monounsaturated fats
Good for: Pan, deep and shallow-frying, salads and marinades
What it’s famous for: It’s the healthier oil option as it has the lowest saturated fat of commonly used vegetable oils.

IconSmoke point: 230 – 240°C

 

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A photo of the raw cottonseed before it is made into oil

Cottonseed Oil

What it is made of: Cottonseed oil is created from the seeds of a number of cotton plants. It is versatile vegetable oil.
Feature: High in Omega 6 polyunsaturated fat
Good for: Deep and shallow-frying
What it’s famous for: Stable at high-temperature cooking and provides a subtle flavour through the food.

IconSmoke point: 230 – 240°C

 

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Photo of sunflowers in a field

Sunflower Oil

What it is made of: Sunflower oil is made from the seeds of the sunflower plant that yields 40% oil.
Features: High in Omega 6 polyunsaturated fats
Good for: Deep and shallow-frying and dressings
What it’s famous for: It is mostly used for deep frying, baking and roasting because it provides the food with a clean taste.

IconSmoke point: 230 – 240°C

 

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Photo of Olive Oil being drizzled over some fresh bread

Olive Oil

What it is made of: Olive oil is created from the fruit of an olive tree and comes in a number of varieties, including extra virgin olive oil, virgin olive oil and refined olive oil.
Features: High in monounsaturated fats
Good for: General purposes
What it’s famous for: Extra Virgin and Virgin Olive Oil provide an olive flavour to foods, which makes it a popular dressing and for shallow frying.

IconSmoke point:
Extra Virgin: 170 – 180°C;
Virgin Olive Oil: 200 – 210°C;
Refined: 230 – 240°C

 

Download our Guide to using Oils in your Kitchen

 

Image of coconuts being broken open

Coconut Oil

What it is made of: Coconut oil is derived from the flesh of a coconut from a palm tree.
Features: Contains over 90% saturated fatty acids.
Good for: Creams and pan frying
What it’s famous for: Because it is high in saturated fats and has a low smoke point, it is therefore not very heat stable. However, it does provide a subtle coconut flavour to dishes.

IconSmoke point: 170 – 180°C

 

Image of corn being made into corn oil

Corn Oil

What it is made of: Corn oil is extracted from the seed, which is also known as the germ of the maize. The germs are rich in nutrients and contain 20% of oil.
Features: It is high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and is low in saturated fat.
Good for: Deep-frying
What it’s famous for: It is used for general purpose cooking and provides a subtle corn flavour and a deep yellow colour to foods.

IconSmoke point: 170 – 180°C

 

The image shows soybeans in a bowl and oil in a pot

Soybean Oil

What it is made of: Soybean oil is derived from soya beans, which are a member of the legume family. Each yield of the seed holds an estimate of 20% oil.
Features: High in polyunsaturated fats and a source of Omega 3
Good for: General purpose cooking and frying
What it’s famous for: It is ideal for salads, marinades, pan and shallow frying.

IconSmoke point: 230 – 240°C

 

Image of Rice Bran Oil

Rice Bran Oil

What it is made of: Rice Bran Oil is extracted from the bran (hard outer layer) of the rice grain.
Features: It is known for its high smoke point and mild flavour. It is high in antioxidant y-oryzanol and vitamin E
Good for: Shallow and deep-frying and as an ingredient
What it’s famous for: It is great for salad dressings, marinades, mayonnaise and deep-frying.

IconSmoke point: 250°C

 

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The peanuts are on a cloth with the oil in a jar next to them

Peanut Oil

What it is made of: Peanut oil is created from the pressing of peanuts that are rich in oil.
Features: High in monounsaturated fats
Good for: Shallow-frying and baking
What it’s famous for: It is very good to use for stir-frying foods because it provides a subtle peanut flavour.

IconSmoke point: 230 – 240°C

 

Photo of raw tallow

Tallow

What it is made of: Tallow is the fat rendered from cattle. It is purchased as a solid fat, that is then melted down for usage.
Features: It contains saturated fats
Good for: Baking and deep-frying
What it’s famous for: It is ideal for deep frying, providing a distinct beef flavour to the food. It also remains solid at room temperature and is a cheaper offering.

IconSmoke point: 240 – 250°C

 

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Photo showing a spoonful of lard

Lard

What it is made of: Lard is fat rendered from pigs. It is obtained from any part of the pig where there is a high proportion of fatty tissue.
Features: Made from 40% saturated fat, 50% monounsaturated fat and 10% polyunsaturated fats
Good for: Deep-frying, baking and roasting
What it’s famous for: It remains solid at room temperature and provides a light pork flavour through the product. Lard is great for baking and deep-frying foods.

IconSmoke point: 190 – 200°C

 

Photo shows a bowl of vegetable shortening

Vegetable Shortening

What it is made of: Vegetable shortening is a solid fat made from a number of vegetable oils.
Features: High in saturated fats and good resistance to oxidation
Good for: Baking, deep-fat frying
What it’s  famous for: It remains solid at room temperature and stable at high-temperature cooking.

IconSmoke point: 240 – 250°C

 

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Download Our Oil Infographic Now.

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